State of The Eco Economy

Since 2009, Lubie Love, the blog, has been a place to learn about alternatives specifically as it relates to energy consumption and vehicles. Simply put – there is no excuse for any individual or company to miss the opportunity to positively consume today – should they have an income.   This was not the case prior to 2009. Positive consumption is the outcome of buying a good that reduces or eliminates negative effects or “externalities” for both the individual and the environment. The auto industry, with leaders like Alan Mulally, Elon Musk, Akio Toyoda, Norbert Reithofer and Carlos Ghosn, have met consumer demand for alternative vehicles.  Each major automaker has options to allow for positive consumption.  Consumers have to respond by continuing to buy the vehicles. Of course the choice does not end there.   Each delivery that you receive for e-commerce can and should be made with a fuel efficient vehicle.  Whether a plane, train or truck, companies have alternatives that positively enhance their profits today. In 2010, GASLAND – The Movie, by Josh Fox, focused the counter debate on energy exploration and the luring incentives that land owners had to consider from natural gas.  Today companies like Encana, EOG, Chesapeake and Clean Energy Fuels Corp (CLNE) have used technology to expand America’s energy independence by developing natural gas.  They have also put individuals to work who otherwise may not have a job.   And for this the companies might be able to claim that they are “positively” consuming – as they are buyers of skilled labor.   At both ends of the spectrum Consumers guide the equation.  We...

Plan for 123 Million Users by 2014

The energy debate America is having is surely making a difference.   The latest technology in exploration from Space to abandoned oil fields and vast non-productive Prairies is allowing each of us to answer the questions: At what price are we willing to trade one way of life for another? At what price will citizens dependent on their Automobile be willing to switch from “dirty” fuels to “clean” alternatives? My concern with these questions became formalized as I participated in the fine art documentary film, LUBIE LOVE – The Movie.  Hard to believe that the release was 4 years ago at New York’s Tribeca Cinema.   In that short amount of time, Apple and Samsung have relegated the desktop computer to a near death along with the slow-to-adapt Blackberry.   Next year, nearly 123 Million users will be watching – consuming TV and digital content on “SmartTVs.”   With just a click of the keypad, mouse, smartphone or remote, an independent film like LUBIE LOVE  can be watched and reviewed 123 Million times! (Review your copy here). Yesterday, in my home state of Colorado, three Colorado communities voted to let more facts on Fracking be known.  They voted on extending a moratorium on hyrdrolic fracturing by as much as 5 more years.  Boulder, Layfette and Fort Collins chose to say “No” for now.   They also chose to embrace a “clean environment” where drinking water is likely to be one of the Front Range’s biggest obstacles to sustained growth. Credit can be given to my contemporary in film, Josh Fox.   He successfully galvanized a national awareness of drinking water being...

The Fracknation Energy Plan – Not Gasland

In a classic display of concern and interest, citizens of all walks of life appeared for the screening of Gasland 2 in Boulder Wednesday evening.   The Glenn Miller Ballroom was home to the launch of independent film director Josh Fox’s latest update on the troubling energy process called Fracking.  Boulder was an ideal site for Josh and his primary underwriter, HBO, to screen a relevant and galvanizing film.  It is a film that shows how everyone’s backyard is impacted by the presence of an abundant energy supply – in this case Natural Gas.   NIMBY (Not In My Backyard) is not going to be enough when fracking natural gas becomes an acceptable practice throughout the United States. For those who do not know, America’s lack of an energy policy has led to a diversified plan to extract what ever is economically viable from our natural resources in a general attempt to become energy independent and regain our leadership in supplying the world with energy.   What Gasland 2 shows is that the stakes are higher than ever for not just a few American landowners with mineral rights (Josh included) but for the vast areas of land that produce natural gas.  These areas lay below our homes in rural and urban areas alike.   In one scene Josh joins fellow film maker Chris Paine (Revenge of The Electric Car) on a quick ride through the hills outside Hollywood, California which once again have become productive and economically viable plots for performing oil and gas wells. Josh has succeeded in bringing attention to a national issue that is being heavily lobbied by big...

Promised Land

With America and other countries, most notably, Venezuela heading to the polls, voters have to be informed.  The cornerstone of the first American debate between “Big Bird” and “The Fumbler” in Denver was the economy.  It’s obvious that no matter who ends up in office, they will be unable to drive America into a better economic environment.  Corporations – made of folks concerned about their own jobs and family fortunes are less prone to put their jobs at risk to make the community, cities, and country a better place.  For Coloradan’s a new movie set to hit the screens in December will hit home.  “Promised Land”, featuring Matt Damon and a blockbuster cast and director (Yes Matt has reconnected wtih his Good Will Hunting Director Gus Van Sant), are expanding on Josh Foxes’ HBO film GASLAND.    For those in Longmont, Colorado choosing correctly on Question 300 will likely be played out twice – once in the voter booth and then on the big screen. While Fox was first driven to choose between selling out his family’s land for mineral riches when natural gas companies came knocking, his documentary in 2009 set the stage on the natural gas fracking debate.   Promises of riches are what farmers, rural land owners and states are faced with daily.   Communities that once flourished, from countless towns in Pennsylvania to Louisiana, Florida to Washington, have to decide – feast or famine. What is most interesting about “Promised Land – The Movie” is it poses Damon’s character in the role faced by a big company employee.  Like other major films, The Social Network comes to...

Revenge – The Movie has an uncanny feeling

Many of us wish for the day when fueling up at the pump is an after thought.  In 2006, some American car owners – everyday Janes and Joes to celebrities and dignitaries – thought the EV1 would surely answer a century of dependence on oil.  Before they could add serious mileage to their vehicles, the major auto manufacturers recalled, repossessed and ultimately destroyed these fuel efficient vehicles.  The film “Who Killed The Electric Car” vilified the manufacturers for their brash actions.  They broke basic tenets of supply and demand. General Motors, Toyota, and others actually had uncovered a new “money” tree.  The concept of green vehicles – where there will be a day where every automobile on the road will be quiet, efficient, stylish and perhaps most important enhance the environment for all – became a luxury good.  Poor Jane and Joe.  The only place they can go today is to a dirty fuel efficient ride. Nissan Motors, along with GM, Toyota, Tesla and others are in a race to bring the electric car to the masses.   In the movie first screened at the 2011 Tribeca Film Festival, “Revenge of the Electric Car“, is a amazing story of how the smallest enthusiast to the largest manufacturers of the world have heard the cries of the consumer.  Without government subsidy though, vehicle’s like the Nissan Leaf have sticker prices more like luxury cars from 2006.  It is 2011 and as a second vehicle used to travel locally, the modern, feasible purely electric vehicle can meet most of the consumer’s wishes – $3/fill up has definite curb appeal.  Unfortunately the targeted...

HBO to promote GM plant closing film

If you have a friend, neighbor or relative impacted by America’s continued battle with progress in industry, HBO has a documentary flick brewing for you. It is called “The Last Truck” and it’s a singular view on the impact of a auto manufacturer closing down yet another facility supposedly without care to it’s labor force. It’s a human story of course but one that you may have heard and seen time and time again. The basics are: company can’t make a good product, consumers don’t buy over-hyped product, company isolates it’s weakest link, the plant announces a closing, the proud work force – neglected by it’s own political state leadership and it’s company’s inability to make a great product – has to find a new gig. While this is told to bring to light how proud and loyal a work force was, it is unfortunate that both the company (GM in Dayton) and the Union were unable to retool for the modern rigors of consumer preferences. As a predictable result, families and friends where left blindsided by obsolete technologies and methodologies. If the film does anything for Dayton it hopefully will be that the American worker will wake up to the fact that jobs aren’t guaranteed especially when products are made that miss the mark on consumer preferences. Since audiences would prefer to see, dwell and relish on the glory of once what was vs. the potential glory of what can be, The Last Truck by HBO should be a barn burner. Filmwise, these are elements that make movies interesting and compelling. Distribution wise, this film is scheduled for...