New Jersey is a Tin Lizzy auto state

New Jersey is a Tin Lizzy auto state

For the auto dealer, New Jersey’s denial of the Tesla dealer model is very short sighted.    It is not about enabling a fair competitive playing field.  The decision to regulate is an example of domestic job protectionism.   Just step back and think about how Henry Ford came up with the Model T.   People were traveling New Jersey’s roads by horse and buggy, foot or bicycle.   The process would still be here today if  yesterday’s ruling were applied then.   It was product innovation that changed America.   It was an interesting and effective way to travel that quickly transformed initially America and subsequently the global transportation system.   Had regulators prevented the formation of Ford’s manufacturing facilities in New Jersey, horse and buggy navigation systems would be in demand today – as well as land for stables along the Hudson or Delaware. Yet consumers have been driving the model at Tesla.  Sure Tesla, like GM, had bailout funds.   And it is without question that Tesla’s capital intensive models would not be possible without some level of government support.   When auto dealers, like book stores, galleries, shoe stores, and other retail oriented businesses have to rely on the internet for a sale, it is foolish to cap the state’s potential with “standards” that are far from competitive.   New Jersey is not interested in Free Market Capitalism.   Nor is it a free-for-all in the industry.   What New Jersey’s decision shows is the government and its bureaucracy can not plan for the advances in technology and consumer buying...

A nation on (c)Track?

As the summer driving season comes to a close, it’s easy to see how far we – as commuters – have changed.  The country is on course to two distinct paths: cheap fuel for the masses at the expense of the environment (natural gas abound); expensive alternatives for those who can breath rarefied air and preach to the masses.   The later is putting their emphasis on a frail electrical grid that currently connects their homes.  The same group tends to be highly educated, urbanites who love their elitism.   Yet the masses are those who major motor companies want to – and continue to attract to their show rooms.  Tesla vs. Ford should be the new automotive paradigm. Yet old habits die hard. Telsa has the possibility of producing more cars a year that are clean, fast and furious than most of it’s competitors.   Ford simply has the embedded driver locked into a belief that independence only can come through gas.  The hinterlanders – many who love their country and live in a hood very close to you and me – are blinded by failed back to work promises and pride rather than pure self reliance.  There is no question that a truck loving commuter can haul their load in a 9 mile to the gallon rig.  But have they actually tried an electric powered truck to do the same commuter job?  Likely not – as few are on the road to date. Certainly, four years from now, like the four that have just past, consumers will see advances in their automobile options.   SUVs will certainly be electric and possibly...

HBO to promote GM plant closing film

If you have a friend, neighbor or relative impacted by America’s continued battle with progress in industry, HBO has a documentary flick brewing for you. It is called “The Last Truck” and it’s a singular view on the impact of a auto manufacturer closing down yet another facility supposedly without care to it’s labor force. It’s a human story of course but one that you may have heard and seen time and time again. The basics are: company can’t make a good product, consumers don’t buy over-hyped product, company isolates it’s weakest link, the plant announces a closing, the proud work force – neglected by it’s own political state leadership and it’s company’s inability to make a great product – has to find a new gig. While this is told to bring to light how proud and loyal a work force was, it is unfortunate that both the company (GM in Dayton) and the Union were unable to retool for the modern rigors of consumer preferences. As a predictable result, families and friends where left blindsided by obsolete technologies and methodologies. If the film does anything for Dayton it hopefully will be that the American worker will wake up to the fact that jobs aren’t guaranteed especially when products are made that miss the mark on consumer preferences. Since audiences would prefer to see, dwell and relish on the glory of once what was vs. the potential glory of what can be, The Last Truck by HBO should be a barn burner. Filmwise, these are elements that make movies interesting and compelling. Distribution wise, this film is scheduled for...

Skewed data for the 2007 Nissan Murano

For those driving the venerable SUV to and fro – like a 2007 Nissan Murano, here is what the official mileage-ratings are: http://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/noframes/23825.shtml Yet Cavet-Emptor: These numbers seemed skewed compared to actual drivers results. Our test vehicle in LUBIE LOVE – The Movie keeps on proving that even the foreign makes benefit from government sampling. The actual variance in gas pricing, user habits (bad and good), whether tested in the mountains or at sea level all compound the differences. What are the differences? 19 miles/gallon is the average per fueleconomy.gov and 16.7 is 2nd year average for our test vehicle. The actual size of the tank: brand new, the 2007 Murano had 264 miles to a tank rather than the fueleconomy.gov number of 371. Are we mistaken that a 30% difference in fuel economy is acceptable? Maybe Madoff accounting can attest for the discrepancy. The average cost to fill her up is $59.16/tank or annually averaging almost $2500. Of course the savings in fueleconomy’s number means you would have more buckos for them nachos and large big gulps as you spend nearly 3.6 visits to your neighborhood gas station each month. Can’t wait for the accuracy behind those new claims of 34 miles to the...